Boeing to upgrade software after 737 Max crash

Boeing, the world’s largest aircraft manufacturer, confirmed that it will deploy a flight control software upgrade in the next couple of weeks for its 737 Max aircraft, which has crashed twice in recent months.

The move comes a day after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 jet crash that killed all 157 people aboard on Sunday (March. 10th).

This prompted a number of airlines from around the world to ground their Boeing 747 Max 8 jets.

The disaster has raised concerns about the reliability of the plane.

Software upgrade

In a statement on Monday (March.11th), the manufacturer said it has been developing a software update in the last couple of month, following the recent Lion Air Flight JT610 crash in late October.

“For the past several months and in the aftermath of Lion Air Flight 610, Boeing has been developing a flight control software enhancement for the 737 Max, designed to make an already safe aircraft even safer,” Boeing said. “This includes updates to the Manoeuvring Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) flight control law, pilot displays, operation manuals, and crew training.”

“The enhanced flight control law incorporates angle of attack (AOA) inputs, limits stabiliser trim commands in response to an erroneous angle of attack reading, and provides a limit to the stabiliser command in order to retain elevator authority,” the manufacturer added.

Aside from Ethiopian Airlines, other airlines that use Boeing 737 Max aircraft, including China, Indonesia, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina have also temporarily grounded their jets as a measure of precaution, according to AP.

As stated in the AP report, Caribbean carrier Cayman Airways, Comair in South Africa, and Royal Air Maroc in Morocco have also temporarily withdrawn its fleets.

Boeing said there are approximately 350 737 Max aircrafts in operation, and has taken over 5,000 orders from over 100 customers around the globe since it entered commercial use in 2017.

Federal Aviation Administration

The jets are designed to be quieter and more fuel efficient than its predecessor.

The US aviation regulator, the Federal Aviation Administration, said in a statement that others had drawn similarities between Indonesia and Ethiopia crashes, but the agency had not.

“This investigation has just begun and to date, we have not been provided data to draw any conclusions or take any actions,” the agency added.

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